26 September 2012 11:39 AM

How about a job at...the Civil Service Fast Stream?

The Civil Service Fast Stream is a unique graduate scheme that's designed to catapult the very best graduates into top-level roles across the UK. Sound good? Read on!

The Fast Stream allows you to gain a huge range of experience in a very short time. Fast Streamers undertake a variety of placements, move between projects and try out areas of work to build up a portfolio of experience that's hard to beat. Find out more about government and public sector careers here.

Starting salaries usually range between around £25, 000 and £27,000 and you'll be expected to be flexible - you need to follow the job wherever it takes you across the UK!

Click here to find out more!


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19 September 2012 08:50 AM

Spotlight on: HR Graduate Jobs

HR has shed its paper-pushing image in the last few years and is seen as an increasingly attractive destination for graduates from all degree disciplines. If you're commercially aware and also a real people person - tactful, empathetic, confident and a great communicator - who wants to use these skills in business, this could be the industry for you.

Watch a real HR professional talking about the best and worst bits of his job here.

HR departments have historically had a bit of a bad rep as the boring, 'computer says no' zone in the company - so part of your role as a modern HR professional is to change this image! HR strategy these days is very much about retaining and developing staff, not just making sure they follow the rules arbitrarily. Your understanding of employment law needs to be top-notch, too, so HR can be a good choice for law graduates who've decided that life as a solicitor or barrister isn't for them, but still want to use what they've learned in a business context.

With many companies recognising the advantages of flexible working, part of any modern HR role is to help the company and staff maintain a work-life balance that's mutually beneficial to everyone. To do this requires tact, diplomacy, empathy, assertiveness and negotiation skills. Remember that you will often be dealing with people who are in difficult or emotionally-charged situations - illness, bullying and work stress don't tend to leave people in the most calm frame of mind.

As well as the day-to-day liaison between staff and employers, HR professionals also have a big role to play in the strategic direction of the company. At a senior level, HR teams will advise on employing the right balance of staff in terms of skills and experience, advise on and help to implement training and development programmes across the company, consult with recruitment agencies, give input on pay scales, ensure compliance with current employment and working practise legislation, and lead company strategy on equality and diversity. Whew!

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10 September 2012 09:48 AM

Top Tips For Developing The Skills You Need For A Graduate Job

  • Network, network, network! Family, friends, contacts you meet by chance – it all counts!

  • Go to university careers fairs and employer presentations – not only can you pick up lots of helpful info on the industries you’re keen on, you will also have the chance to make a lasting impression with recruiters.


A final tip - believe in your own abilities and focus on presenting yourself as confident...but not arrogant. No one wants to spend all day working with someone who's full of themselves!

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06 September 2012 09:09 AM

Guest post: Cybersecurity Sector Seen as Secure Employer for Graduates

 

With the continuing instability of many key UK employment sectors, a sure thing is hard to find. However, cybersecurity has been heralded as an extremely secure career option for graduates with the right skills to offer.

Thanks to the rising demand for online security services and the relative scarcity of qualified candidates, the genuine difficulty faced by many job hunting graduates of ‘too much competition, too few openings’ doesn't apply in this dynamic employment sector. Both private sector and government institutions need the services of hundreds more experts in the near future to combat the rising tide of cyber-related attacks, as well as the more mundane annoyances of low-tech spammers that plague today’s internet.

While the majority of the cybersecurity industry creates tech support jobs that deal with the daily countering of these low-tech nuisances, at the other end of the scale experts are needed to fend off more sophisticated cyber-attacks. These can take the form of defrauding attacks designed to steal or misappropriate capital, or in more deadly instances they can target critical digital infrastructure that can cripple power grids or banking systems with impunity.

Cyber-related attacks are a global threat with a cost to the British Government that not even the most well-informed experts can agree on, but it certainly runs into billions of pounds every year. While the demand for cybersecurity is there, the supply doesn’t measure up to it. Edwin Kanerva, Vice President at Booz Allen Hamilton, recently said: “It’s tough going out there. Every company is looking for the same thing. There’s just not enough of them. The gene pool is small.”

Given the job security and relatively high salary that a cybersecurity expert can expect to enjoy, the number of new graduates who are entering the field remains disproportionally low. Perhaps the most obvious reason for this 'small gene pool' of employable graduates in this field is the fact that students who study computer science are being lured away by the bright lights of computer engineering or software development.

The most exciting tech companies, who have Silicon Valley headquarters and a large presence in the UK, are proving to be too much of an attraction to eager young graduates with computer science degrees. The large salaries and inherent coolness of innovative tech companies means that careers with Google, Microsoft and Oracle are highly sought after, drawing computer studies graduates away from online security firms and government departments. These tech giants are also increasingly reaching out to pluck potential candidates from the graduate pool to employ them in Java jobs, as the programming language has come under fire recently for its supposed security issues.

While software development jobs with this kind of employer may be an attractive option, graduates with computer related qualifications should certainly consider the variety of excellent employers looking for cybersecurity experts. The generous salaries, job security and relatively lower levels of competition make it an excellent employment sector.

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22 August 2012 10:21 AM

5 Things You Need to Know About Engineering Graduate Jobs

Engineering can get a bit of a bad rep, unfortunately, which is a shame because it has the potential to be one of the most satisfying and stable careers out there. Read on to find out five things every aspiring engineer must know:

  1. It's not just for the guys! Watch this film to find out what women who work in engineering have to say - the general consensus seems to be that not only is it not nearly as 'blokey' as you might think, it's also easier to get noticed for being good at your job when you're the only woman on the team!
  2. There are plenty of jobs in engineering companies for non-engineers - think Sales and Marketing, Project Management, HR, Logistics. A graduate scheme at an engineering company can be a great way to get transferable business skill that will translate to a wide range of careers.
  3. It can offer some of the most flexible hours of any professional job - many companies offer perks like flexitime, and some even give you every Friday afternoon off - yes, really! 
  4. Some engineering graduate schemes will consider candidates with a 2.2 - so this industry can be a good choice if you've not quite hit the grade you hoped for.
  5. Engineering can offer the option of lots of international travel if that's something that takes your fancy - definitely worth bearing in mind, we say!

For more information on careers in engineering, click here.

Or click on the image below...

 


21 August 2012 03:30 PM

3 Ways to Top Up Your Summer CV

So, the summer vacation is in full swing, any internships or summer placements are drawing to a close, and it's raining (again) - what's a bored student to do? Far from being a drag, the end of the summer vacation can be a great time to build up your skills and show future employers that you're capable of seeking out opportunities and making things happen. Read on for our Top Three Tips:

  1. Getting a part-time job can be a great way to keep busy, gain useful 'soft' skills such as communication and dealing with customers - and, of course, earn some much-needed cash before the Autumn loan payment kicks in! You can also use even the crummiest job to your advantage on those all-important application forms - click here to find out how.
  2. If jobs are thin on the ground - or if earning money isn't your main priority right now - why not look into volunteering locally? Summer is a great time to give something back to a cause you love. In fact, a lot of employers like to see volunteering on a CV because it suggests you're someone who's well-rounded and socially responsible.
  3. Learn something new! Yes, this may seem like the last thing you want to do after a year of studying hard, but it's a great way to add to that pesky 'Other Relevant Skills' section on application forms. This doesn't need to be a formal qualification - there are plenty of online courses where you can teach yourself a new language, learn some basic programming or brush up on your typing and Microsoft Office skills.

It goes without saying - don't forget to relax and unwind, too! You've got to be ready for the start of the new term and (more importantly) ready to party all night in Fresher's Week!


20 August 2012 04:12 PM

The Perfect Graduate CV: Dos and Don'ts

So, you’ve decided that the whole corporate-grad-scheme-application-form route isn’t for you. You’ve found a couple of entry-level jobs that sound just perfect. They all ask for a CV. You don’t have one. Now what do you do?

Essentially, a CV is a list of your work and educational achievements to date. Note that it’s not a list of ALL your achievements – your future employer doesn’t want to hear about your SATs results or your grade two cello certificate – instead it should be detailed, professional and focussed. Here's a quick rundown of what each section should (and shouldn't) contain:

Contact details
Do:

  • Put your name, address, phone number and email address. And make sure they're all correct. How else will they get in touch to offer you an interview!?

Don’t:

  • Include irrelevant personal information, like your age, religion, marital status, or a photo of yourself, when applying for a UK-based role. This is standard practise in some countries but is considered unprofessional in the UK, and could open the employer up to charges of discrimination based on age, looks, race, etc – so it’s best avoided.

  • Fire off emails from any address containing any the following: random MySpace-style capitalisation (how old ARE you?), the words ‘sexy’, ‘babe’ or ‘hot’, cutesy nicknames, or references to your fondness for all-night benders. If you have any doubts about the professional appropriateness of your email address, it’s not appropriate. Set up an account with a sensible address – you can’t go wrong with something along the lines of firstname.lastname@emailprovider.com.


Personal statement
Do:

  • Keep it short – remember the abstract you had to write for your dissertation? This is the equivalent, so proportionally it should be two or three lines, max.

Don't:

  • Feel like you have to include one for the sake of it. Having said that, it’s quite a good way to summarise your CV for the recruiter – and anything that makes their life easier after reading 100+ CVs is bound to count in your favour. 


Work experience
Do:

  • Start with the most recent job and work backwards, making sure that you list any useful skills or responsibilities.
  • Get the balance right between inserting buzzwords that the recruiter will pick up on when they scan through the CV, and resorting to clichés. Positive, action-filled words like ‘organised’, ‘managed’, ‘coordinated’ and ‘responsibility’ are all great – generic sentences like ‘I have great customer service skills’ are less useful and fill up valuable space. A sentence like this is only acceptable if followed by ‘…because I did x and y while working in job z.’

Don't:

  • List every job you've ever had from babysitting to bar work. If, for example, you've had a succession of bar jobs plus one or two internships, it’s worth listing those first in more detail, then summarising the less relevant bar work in one or two lines – unless, of course, you’re applying to work in a bar!


Education
Do:

  • List your educational achievements reverse chronological order, starting with your degree and working backwards.
  • List your A-Levels in full.
  • Consider putting 'Education' at the beginning of your CV you’re a recent graduate with no work experience but who boasts a shiny new 1st from a top university.

Don't:

  • List all your GCSEs if you're pressed for space. It's fine to put something like ‘9 GCSEs at grades A*-B, including English and Maths’ – this shows employers what they need to know without boring them with the finer details of your GCSE French coursework.

Relevant skills
Do:

  • Include things like unusual software packages you can use, organizations or societies you belong to, positions of responsibility you've had - anything that adds to the impression that you're a nice, well-rounded, professional person who'd be great to work with!

Don't:

  • List mundane things that 99% of people do in their spare time like 'Going to the pub' or try to be funny - the only exception to this is if you are applying for a very select group of industries i.e. certain branches of media and advertising. Tread very carefully here - and if in doubt, keep it friendly but professional.

Final thoughts
Most people put off writing a CV until faced with a job application deadline, but it’s worth keeping a generic version of your CV up to date at all times, which you can then tailor to suit each job you apply for. Warning for the unwary and/or lazy: when we say tailor, we mean just that – NOT rewrite two sentences, stick in the name of the company and press send!


27 July 2012 09:07 AM

Just Graduated? Pondering Postgraduate Study? Read On!

The lure of another year to make up your mind, or a wise choice for your future career? Postgraduate study can be both these thing - more often than not, at the same time!

If you're considering a postgraduate course - whether you want to spend another year studying something you adore, or you need a postgrad qualification for your chosen career - there are plenty of options to consider. Unless you're lucky enough to get funding, postgrad courses can be a bit of a pain to finance, so it's essential to make an informed decision.

We've asked experts for their top tips and advice, so watch the video below and take the first step to informed post-uni choices today.

Find out more CLICK HERE

Or click on the image below...

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27 July 2012 09:02 AM

It's Not What You Know...(AKA How To Network Like A Pro)

If there's one thing we hear time and again from employers, it's the importance of professional networks. We're not talking about walking into a job at Daddy's oil company here - everyone can build up a great professional network that'll stand them in good stead for their future career.

So what's the best way to start building your network?
 
And how do you squeeze the most out of your contacts?
 
We wanted to find out, so we asked a whole bunch of very well-connected professional types what their secrets were - and they were very happy to divulge. Here's a video of what we learnt. It includes advice from people who've been there and done that when it comes to winning friends and influencing people!
 


Find out more CLICK HERE


Or click on the image below...

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12 April 2012 02:26 PM

Guest Post: Relevant Work Experience Valued by Graduates over Part-Time Jobs

As competition amongst young people for graduate jobs remains fierce, placement work schemes and placements that offer relevant work experience are becoming more highly prized over part-time jobs that may pay better but are less relevant to the graduate’s desired career path.

During their university years, students have often been advised to take almost any form of part-time work between term time. This not only helps ease the financial burden of student life but also stands students in good stead for the process of job applications later on.

However, the advice now being given to students is to be more discerning in what they take on between terms and even before arriving at university in order to secure the best chances of getting a position in the industry of their choice. Building up a portfolio of work experience that is relevant to their chosen industry can be far more valuable than simply picking the first thing that’s offered on a campus jobs board.

This is not to say that student won’t gain valuable skills and experience working part-time in the services industry or other fields of a more temporary nature. However, graduate careers advisors have warned that this type of work experience by itself may not be enough to secure them their preferred job after graduation.

Instead, university based programmes which offer built-in work placement schemes and internships have become an increasingly appealing prospect and have been espoused by both careers advisors and business CEOs as the ideal means to get graduates onto their chosen career path. Degrees with an additional year of work placement after three years of academic study are being offered by an increasing variety of business schools and universities as relevant work experience rises on the priority list of prospective employers, especially those offering IT jobs in London.

After reviewing the process of collaboration universities and businesses, Sir Tim Wilson fully endorsed work placements and internship schemes that allowed students to amass vital work experience before entering the often tough proving grounds of finding their first position after graduating. His research suggested that students became eminently more employable after completing such schemes.

He said: "I think we're beginning to see internships being used as part of an extended interview process. The evidence that a placement year improves employability opportunities is strong while a lack of work experience appears as a key barrier."

A report from the Office for National Statistics has shown that the graduate population has rocketed in the last 10 years by more than 430,000. Clearly this makes for much stiffer competition for the most attractive positions as they complete their studies, in all industries from accountancy to IT jobs UK wide. With the prospect of a solid year of relevant work experience behind them, graduates stand a much better chance of standing out against the much expanded crowd.

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