26 September 2012 11:39 AM

How about a job at...the Civil Service Fast Stream?

The Civil Service Fast Stream is a unique graduate scheme that's designed to catapult the very best graduates into top-level roles across the UK. Sound good? Read on!

The Fast Stream allows you to gain a huge range of experience in a very short time. Fast Streamers undertake a variety of placements, move between projects and try out areas of work to build up a portfolio of experience that's hard to beat. Find out more about government and public sector careers here.

Starting salaries usually range between around £25, 000 and £27,000 and you'll be expected to be flexible - you need to follow the job wherever it takes you across the UK!

Click here to find out more!


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19 September 2012 08:50 AM

Spotlight on: HR Graduate Jobs

HR has shed its paper-pushing image in the last few years and is seen as an increasingly attractive destination for graduates from all degree disciplines. If you're commercially aware and also a real people person - tactful, empathetic, confident and a great communicator - who wants to use these skills in business, this could be the industry for you.

Watch a real HR professional talking about the best and worst bits of his job here.

HR departments have historically had a bit of a bad rep as the boring, 'computer says no' zone in the company - so part of your role as a modern HR professional is to change this image! HR strategy these days is very much about retaining and developing staff, not just making sure they follow the rules arbitrarily. Your understanding of employment law needs to be top-notch, too, so HR can be a good choice for law graduates who've decided that life as a solicitor or barrister isn't for them, but still want to use what they've learned in a business context.

With many companies recognising the advantages of flexible working, part of any modern HR role is to help the company and staff maintain a work-life balance that's mutually beneficial to everyone. To do this requires tact, diplomacy, empathy, assertiveness and negotiation skills. Remember that you will often be dealing with people who are in difficult or emotionally-charged situations - illness, bullying and work stress don't tend to leave people in the most calm frame of mind.

As well as the day-to-day liaison between staff and employers, HR professionals also have a big role to play in the strategic direction of the company. At a senior level, HR teams will advise on employing the right balance of staff in terms of skills and experience, advise on and help to implement training and development programmes across the company, consult with recruitment agencies, give input on pay scales, ensure compliance with current employment and working practise legislation, and lead company strategy on equality and diversity. Whew!

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10 September 2012 09:48 AM

Top Tips For Developing The Skills You Need For A Graduate Job

  • Network, network, network! Family, friends, contacts you meet by chance – it all counts!

  • Go to university careers fairs and employer presentations – not only can you pick up lots of helpful info on the industries you’re keen on, you will also have the chance to make a lasting impression with recruiters.


A final tip - believe in your own abilities and focus on presenting yourself as confident...but not arrogant. No one wants to spend all day working with someone who's full of themselves!

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10 September 2012 09:28 AM

Four Vital Skills for Landing your First Job

Graduate employers aren’t just interested in hiring candidates with the right qualifications – they’re also keen to meet people with the right skills for their company. The top skills graduate recruiters want are:

1. Commercial awareness - this is about knowing how a business works, how it’s positioned in the marketplace and how it relates to the wide economy.
    
2. Communication skills – this vital ability covers putting your point across effectively, public speaking, listening to people, writing well, and tailoring your message to your audience.

3. Motivation – are you someone who can pick themselves up again after a setback? Can you keep persevering when the going gets tough?


4. Confidence – can you be assertive without being arrogant? Can you master business lingo and meet company directors without sounding nervous? 


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06 September 2012 03:44 PM

The Survival Guide to Freshers Week: Practical and not-so-practical tips

Ah, Fresher's Week...if we could sum it up in two words they would be 'chatting' and 'queues'. You will spend the entire week non-stop gabbing away to all your new housemates, coursemates, randoms you pick up on nights out, and people waiting to register for their student cards. Which brings us neatly onto queues - you will queue for the aforementioned student card, NUS card, medical registration, library registration, etc. Not the most fun in the world when you've got a crashing hangover from one Sambuca too many the night before, but it's actually not a bad way to meet new people, which is the main point of Fresher's Week. After all, you'll be doing too much of this in subsequent uni years, so have fun and socialise while you can!

Practical stuff:

- Before you even think about cracking open that bottle of Malibu, make sure you register for the essential things that will keep you alive - doctor, dentist, student discount card, passport photos, library card, internet passwords, TV license, council tax exemption certificate.

- Store some local taxi numbers and the postcode of your halls of residence in your phone to avoid getting lost - nothing worse than realising you're stuck in a strange town at 3am!

- It goes without saying, really, but don't do anything stupid. 'Stupid' covers walking home alone at night, unprotected fumblings, accepting drinks from strangers, and anything else that would reasonably warrant a slap round the head from your mum.

Now, down to business:


- DON'T sit in your room and feel homesick. Contrary to popular belief, Freshers' Week isn't all about drinking - it's also about meeting people. Even if you're not the loud partying type, make sure you get out there and at least chat to your fellow quiet types - it's likely they'll be thrilled that someone has broken the ice, so don't be scared to strike up conversations. Feeling too shy to know where to begin? This video has some great tips for the nervous...

- Make sure you join at least one society. Societies can be a great way to meet like-minded nerds people with similar interests, so dive in. But don't spend crazy amounts of cash on signing up in your first week - many societies will let you come along to a few meetings first to get a taste for the action.

- Be open minded. One of the best things about university is the chance to make friends with people who are absolutely nothing like you in tastes, background, education or nationality. Don't automatically assume that you won't get on with the loud blonde girl with the double-barrelled name, the Morrissey lookalike with the hipster specs or the shy Japanese engineering student. Some of the greatest university friendships come from the most unlikely places, so expand your mind and give everyone a chance!

- Bring something to share with your new housemates on the first day. Everyone brings cakes or biscuits, so try something a bit off the wall - how about a football, party poppers, bubbles or a frisbee? It doesn't really matter what you go for - the point is to break the ice.

- Make sure you eat something involving fruit or vegetables to stave off the dreaded Fresher's Flu. At least once during the week.

- Make sure you register for all your classes on time - you don't want to start week two and be met with blank looks from your lecturers! 

- Most importantly, have fun!

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06 September 2012 09:09 AM

Guest post: Cybersecurity Sector Seen as Secure Employer for Graduates

 

With the continuing instability of many key UK employment sectors, a sure thing is hard to find. However, cybersecurity has been heralded as an extremely secure career option for graduates with the right skills to offer.

Thanks to the rising demand for online security services and the relative scarcity of qualified candidates, the genuine difficulty faced by many job hunting graduates of ‘too much competition, too few openings’ doesn't apply in this dynamic employment sector. Both private sector and government institutions need the services of hundreds more experts in the near future to combat the rising tide of cyber-related attacks, as well as the more mundane annoyances of low-tech spammers that plague today’s internet.

While the majority of the cybersecurity industry creates tech support jobs that deal with the daily countering of these low-tech nuisances, at the other end of the scale experts are needed to fend off more sophisticated cyber-attacks. These can take the form of defrauding attacks designed to steal or misappropriate capital, or in more deadly instances they can target critical digital infrastructure that can cripple power grids or banking systems with impunity.

Cyber-related attacks are a global threat with a cost to the British Government that not even the most well-informed experts can agree on, but it certainly runs into billions of pounds every year. While the demand for cybersecurity is there, the supply doesn’t measure up to it. Edwin Kanerva, Vice President at Booz Allen Hamilton, recently said: “It’s tough going out there. Every company is looking for the same thing. There’s just not enough of them. The gene pool is small.”

Given the job security and relatively high salary that a cybersecurity expert can expect to enjoy, the number of new graduates who are entering the field remains disproportionally low. Perhaps the most obvious reason for this 'small gene pool' of employable graduates in this field is the fact that students who study computer science are being lured away by the bright lights of computer engineering or software development.

The most exciting tech companies, who have Silicon Valley headquarters and a large presence in the UK, are proving to be too much of an attraction to eager young graduates with computer science degrees. The large salaries and inherent coolness of innovative tech companies means that careers with Google, Microsoft and Oracle are highly sought after, drawing computer studies graduates away from online security firms and government departments. These tech giants are also increasingly reaching out to pluck potential candidates from the graduate pool to employ them in Java jobs, as the programming language has come under fire recently for its supposed security issues.

While software development jobs with this kind of employer may be an attractive option, graduates with computer related qualifications should certainly consider the variety of excellent employers looking for cybersecurity experts. The generous salaries, job security and relatively lower levels of competition make it an excellent employment sector.

Image Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/umdnews/5257657315/


03 September 2012 09:50 AM

Behind the scenes...

It's been a busy few weeks at CareerPlayer Towers. Our Sales Team visited possibly the best office reception in the world at Volkswagen - sadly they didn't throw in a free VW campervan!

And no, we don't know why Tom looks so shifty either...maybe he was planning to drive off in one?



We also went to film on location at the Chartered Insurance Institute - think Hogwarts but a teensy bit posher. They had a throne, Ladies and Gentlemen. A THRONE.

Which Rob enjoyed perhaps a little too much. He is one cat away from being a Bond villan...

 

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